Earth Abides

Earth Abides
by George R. Stewart


Earth Abides
by George R. Stewart

The cabin had always been a special retreat for Isherwood Williams, a haven from the demands of society. But one day while hiking, Ish was bitten by a rattlesnake, and the solitude he had so desired took on dire new significance.

He was sick for days — although, somehow, he never doubted that he’d live through the ordeal. Often delirious, he did awake at one point to find two strangers peering in at him from the cabin door. Yet oddly, instead of offering help, the two ran off as if terrified.

Not long after that, the coughing began. Ish suffered chills followed by fever, and a measles-like rash that had nothing to do with snake bite broke out on his skin. He was one of the few people in the world to live through that peculiar malady, but he didn’t know it then.

Ish headed home when he finally felt himself again—and noticed the strangeness almost immediately. No cars passed him on the road; the gas station not far from his cabin had an air of abandonment; and he was shocked to see the body of a man lying by the roadside near a small town.

Without a radio or phone, Ish had no idea of humanity’s abrupt demise. He had escaped death, yet could not escape the awesomeness of the catastrophe—and, with an eerie detachment, he found himself curious as to how long it would be before all traces of man’s civilization faded from the Earth.

At the same time, he couldn’t help wondering whether others had survived, and whether even a handful of human beings would


Earth Abides
by George.R. Stewart

In this profound ecological fable, a mysterious plague has destroyed the vast majority of the human race. Isherwood Williams, one of the few survivors, returns from a wilderness field trip to discover that civilization has vanished during his absence.

Eventually he returns to San Francisco and encounters a female survivor who becomes his wife. Around them and their children a small community develops, living like their pioneer ancestors, but rebuilding civilization is beyond their resources, and gradually they return to a simpler way of life.


In The Earth Abides The Flame
by Russell Kirkpatrick

A light to defy darkness . Battered and bruised, suffering grievous loss, the Company enters the great city of Instruere. they have to warn the Council of Faltha of the Destroyer’s threat, and have no idea of the depth of treachery that awaits them. Bhrudwo’s tentacles go far deeper into Faltha than any of the Company realises . they find Instruere to be a city divided against itself, and the Watchers are nowhere to be found. then the arrival of a disturbing stranger ignites the political and religious tensions in the city beyond control. Only one thing could unite a land wracked with such mistrust. But can it be found? Or is the Jugom Ark merely a legend? ‘Rivals the Lord of the Rings with its sense of scale and grandeur’ – Ian Brodie, author of the Lord of the Rings Location Guidebook

The Earth Abides Forever
by Ken Waxlax

Ninety-five thousand acres of prime timberland and three mills are the Jensen family’s crown jewels. In three generations of ownership, the value has multiplied to over a billion dollars. Nick Jensen is a college graduate and in training to take over, when a wild party turns tragic with a young woman left in a coma, Nick’s father dead, and the family business inherited by Isabella Jensen, Nick’s mother and an environmentalist. Their inevitable clash leads to dividing the business, but Nick borrows from the wrong people and finds himself in a squeeze from which escape seems unlikely. When the Spotted Owl is listed as Endangered, chaos ensues. Starting in Eugene, Oregon and spreading to the beaches, mountains, forests, and cities here and abroad, the Jensens struggle with dangerous enemies and valiant dreams. A thrill ride from beginning to end.

Earth Abides
by George R. Stewart


The Life and Truth of George R. Stewart
by Donald M. Scott

Best known for his 1949 post-apocalyptic thriller Earth Abides, George R. Stewart (1895–1980) spent a lifetime wandering the American landscape and writing books about its geography and history. An English professor at the University of California at Berkeley, the exceptional scholar-author penned some of the most remarkable literary works of the 20th century, inventing several types of books along the way—including the road-geography book, micro-history, place-name history, ecological history, and the ecological novel. By weaving human and natural sciences and history into his books Stewart created works with a multi-disciplinary perspective on events and places that influenced numerous other writers, artists, and scientists, including Stephen King, Greg Bear, and Page Stegner. This volume considers George R. Stewart’s rich oeuvre while chronicling a life-long quest to uncover the deepest truths about the man and his work.

Earth Abides
by George Rippey Stewart, Michael West


The World Without Us
by Alan Weisman

A penetrating, page-turning tour of a post-human Earth

In The World Without Us, Alan Weisman offers an utterly original approach to questions of humanity’s impact on the planet: he asks us to envision our Earth, without us.In this far-reaching narrative, Weisman explains how our massive infrastructure would collapse and finally vanish without human presence; which everyday items may become immortalized as fossils; how copper pipes and wiring would be crushed into mere seams of reddish rock; why some of our earliest buildings might be the last architecture left; and how plastic, bronze sculpture, radio waves, and some man-made molecules may be our most lasting gifts to the universe.
The World Without Us reveals how, just days after humans disappear, floods in New York’s subways would start eroding the city’s foundations, and how, as the world’s cities crumble, asphalt jungles would give way to real ones. It describes the distinct ways that organic and chemically treated farms would revert to wild, how billions more birds would flourish, and how cockroaches in unheated cities would perish without us. Drawing on the expertise of engineers, atmospheric scientists, art conservators, zoologists, oil refiners, marine biologists, astrophysicists, religious leaders from rabbis to the Dali Lama, and paleontologists—who describe a prehuman world inhabited by megafauna like giant sloths that stood taller than mammoths—Weisman illustrates what the planet might be like today, if not for us.
From places already devoid of humans (a last fragment of primeval European forest; the Korean DMZ; Chernobyl), Weisman reveals Earth’s tremendous capacity for self-healing. As he shows which human devastations are indelible, and which examples of our highest art and culture would endure longest, Weisman’s narrative ultimately drives toward a radical but persuasive solution that needn’t depend on our demise. It is narrative nonfiction at its finest, and in posing an irresistible concept with both gravity and a highly readable touch, it looks deeply at our effects on the planet in a way that no other book has.


Pickett’s Charge
by George R. Stewart

Back in print–the definitive account of 15 hours that changed the course of world history. This narrativently recreates how itoo familiar story . . . with objectivity . . . (and) explosive detail. . . . (A) stirring book”.–The New Yorker.

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